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Thread: Is natural death the only way out? — On the topic of death

  1. #171 Releasing Grief — by Jack Kornfield 
    The heart of this article is a guided audio meditation on grief. Here's is a bit of his introduction.

    Grief is one of the heart’s natural responses to loss. When we grieve we allow ourselves to feel the truth of our pain, the measure of betrayal or tragedy in our life. By our willingness to mourn, we slowly acknowledge, integrate, and accept the truth of our losses. Sometimes the best way to let go is to grieve.

    It takes courage to grieve, to honor the pain we carry. We can grieve in tears or in meditative silence, in prayer or in song. In touching the pain of recent and long-held griefs, we come face to face with our genuine human vulnerability, with helplessness and hopelessness. These are the storm clouds of the heart.

    Most traditional societies offer ritual and communal support to help people move through grief and loss. We need to respect our tears. Without a wise way to grieve, we can only soldier on, armored and unfeeling, but our hearts cannot learn and grow from the sorrows of the past.
    Releasing Grief — by Jack Kornfield

    https://jackkornfield.com/meditation-grief/


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  2. #172 Fearing Death — by Jack Kornfield 
    From the universal perspective, all things that are born eventually die. Death comes to our best friends and family members, sometimes even to young children. When we grieve, we join in the universal grieving for all those who have died. This is not a tragedy; it is wisdom. From the universal perspective, life is all the more precious and beautiful because it is so fleeting.

    Death is natural. Many people are sick and some will die this year. Some will live years longer and then die. This is our human lot. Because modern culture fosters an intense identification with the outer appearance of the body, going beyond it is not easy. We devote enormous amounts of time to how we look, to dressing, adorning, and strengthening the body. Yet no matter how we cling, as we age the body betrays us. If we limit ourselves to the fulfillment of bodily desires and believe that the body is who we are, when we face aging, sickness, difficulties, and death we will be lost and frightened.
    Fearing Death — by Jack Kornfield

    https://jackkornfield.com/fearing-death/



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  3. #173 What Happens When We Die? Quantum Theory Sheds Light On Life After Death 
    The biggest question so many of us have in life, one that we have been seeking to answer for years: what happens when we die?


    Even modern-day science seeks to answer this question. Where does human consciousness come from and what is its origin? Is it simply a product of the brain, or if the brain itself is a receiver of consciousness. If consciousness is not a product of the brain, it would mean that our physical bodies are not necessary for its continuation; that awareness can exist outside our bodies.

    Asking these questions is fundamental to understanding the true nature of our reality, and with quantum physics gaining more popularity, questions regarding consciousness and its relationship to human physicality become increasingly relevant.Asking these questions is fundamental to understanding the true nature of our reality, and with quantum physics gaining more popularity, questions regarding consciousness and its relationship to human physicality become increasingly relevant.
    Although I'm satisfied with my ideas of the nature of my existence I found Joe's musing to be interesting and perhaps of significant value for somebody so here it is...

    What Happens When We Die? Quantum Theory Sheds Light On Life After Death — by Joe Martino

    https://consciouslifenews.com/happen...eath/11131951/



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  4. #174 When Death Happens — a video presentation of Alan Watts teaching 



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  5. #175 Stephen Jenkinson reimagines dying — ab interview by Pierz Newton-John 
    Having taught classes on grief and dying, I’ve read many books on the subject of death, but nothing quite like Stephen Jenkinson’s Die Wise.

    From the moment I opened it I was galvanised, not just by the depth of its insights, but by its remarkable prose style. Eschewing the cool, objective tone of most modern non-fiction, Stephen adopts a storyteller’s voice: passionate, poetic, at times elliptical and difficult, but always engaged at the level of heart and gut. For all the obvious intelligence, there is nothing academic here: these are the outpourings of a man who has grappled with death intimately, in the trenches of what he likes to call “the death trade”—the palliative care sector. His thesis is that we live in a culture in deep denial of death, a denial reflected in an intervention-addicted medical system that sedates and lies to the dying, ultimately defrauding them of the possibility of a good death.
    This is a wonder interview with an extremely wise man.

    Stephen Jenkinson reimagines dying — ab interview by Pierz Newton-John

    https://www.dumbofeather.com/convers...hen-jenkinson/



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  6. #176 3 Things the Dying Taught Me About Living Well — by Cylon George 
    I am a hospice chaplain.

    I provide spiritual care to the dying and their families.

    I do this by being present with them. I listen to their fears, worries, joys, concerns, and regrets. I listen carefully to what is said, and attend thoughtfully to what is not said.

    When people find out what I do for a living, the reaction is almost universal: “Wow, that must be hard. I could never do it.”

    I totally get it. In fact, years before doing this work, I remember reacting to a hospice volunteer in a very similar way. I was terrified of death. I didn’t like thinking about it or talking about it. I certainly never thought I’d spend my days comforting the dying.

    What I didn’t understand back then was that the dying weren’t another species. They are beautiful and courageous human beings who don’t stop living just because they’re dying. They are no different from the rest of us, except that they are more keenly aware of the preciousness of their time on earth.
    3 Things the Dying Taught Me About Living Well — by Cylon George

    https://tinybuddha.com/blog/3-things...t-living-well/



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  7. #177 The Fascinating History of Cemeteries — by Keith Eggener - A TED-ed video 



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  8. #178 How do you help a grieving friend? — by Megan Devine (a brilliant point of view) 



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  9. #179 Moving Through Grief: I’m Strong Because I Feel It All — by Megan Seamans 
    It’s been almost six months now. Half of a year without my brother and the grief still visits. I’m pretty sure grief doesn’t actually go away, it just gets further and further apart.

    People continue to ask me how I am so “strong” through all of this, mistaking my happy moments as the full picture.

    I continue to tell them strength comes because I feel it all.
    Moving Through Grief: I’m Strong Because I Feel It All — by Megan Seamans

    https://tinybuddha.com/blog/moving-t...i-feel-it-all/



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  10. #180 Why Remembering You’re Going to Die Is the Best Motivator — by Tommy Baker 
    Seneca was a roman philosopher who lived 2000 years ago and a leader of the stoic movement. One of his essays, entitled On the Shortness of Life provides a reminder to all of us: our time here is nearly over.

    And yet what Seneca argues, and does so brilliantly is that life isn’t really short. It’s how we waste so much of it on things that don’t matter: wondering what others think, getting caught up in gossip, wasting our lives on social media and the non-essential.

    When this happens, it’s no wonder we’re lacking clarity and meaning in our lives. It’s no wonder we feel overwhelmed, overworked, and overstimulated on a daily basis. When we’re in this place, we don’t have the time or energy to think about death.

    And yet, our time is running out. I like to think of it this way:

    How many more summers do we have left? How many early June mornings with the sun barely making its presence known as we sip coffee do we have left? How many moments with our kids, family, and those who we love do we have left? How many times do we get to do what we love for yet another day?
    Why Remembering You’re Going to Die Is the Best Motivator — by Tommy Baker

    https://tinybuddha.com/blog/why-reme...est-motivator/


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