One night a few months ago, two friends and I were feeling the onset of winter doldrums, and made a plan to address it with soup.

We had come together for some activity I no longer recall (movie? board game?) but everyone was feeling pretty low. Each of us was clearly addled by one or more ongoing life-woe—angst over relationships, money, health, aimlessness. Nobody wanted to ruin the evening by dumping their laundry on the floor, but it was obvious that we all needed to talk to someone.


So we made a plan to get together, on a different night, to do just that. Somebody would make a big pot of soup, then while we dined, each person would have a chance share their current struggles, and the rest of the group would listen and try to help.


This get-together could function as a kind of support group, only without the intense stranger-vibe of sitting in a folding-chair circle with fourteen anonymous people in a church multi-purpose room.


It would take the form, instead, of a humble dinner with two or three people you already know. But unlike other social get-togethers, you’d be free to bring up what’s really on your mind, knowing you’ve got a safe and supportive audience for it.


Why soup? Well, it’s something people can gather around. It’s easy to make. It’s warm, nourishing, inclusive, and simple.


I don’t remember which one of us coined the phrase, “Soup-port group,” but it stuck.


We’ve been doing it ever since, every few weeks. It’s one of the best things I’ve ever been involved in, and I think it should be happening everywhere. People need to talk, but there aren’t many places to do that. So we made one.
When In Doubt, Make Soup — by David Cain

https://www.raptitude.com/2020/01/wh...ubt-make-soup/